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Thursday 17th of October 2019

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July 2014 - December 2014 - Europe Adolescent, Child, Justice, Juvenile, Offenders, Reintegration, Research, Restorative, Rights, Standards, Victims

Restorative practices support a participative notion of justice, that favours reintegration over retribution and punishment. As such, by investing in the youths' bond to the community and in a process that stimulates assumption of responsibility, restorative practices may prove particularly appropriate to integrate the best interest of the child in the justice process.

Furthermore, this research, through its definite regional connotation, was designed to stress the common denominator of practices that vary considerably from one European country to the other. In particular, the traditional focus on a children´s rights perspective, that prevails in European and EU standards, and that includes both the rights of the offender and the victim.

The project, carried out by the IJJO's European Council for Juvenile Justice, provided for three main outputs, in the form of the following final publications:

Research and Selection of the Most Effective Juvenile Restorative Justice Practices in Europe: Snapshots from 28 EU Member States

The team of experts from Greisfwald University, composed of Professor Frieder Dunkel and Doctor Andrea Parosanu, were in charge of the analysis of existing restorative practices across the 28 EU Member States, reviewed in the 28 final national snapshots. The research investigated the various factors that contribute to the effectiveness of restorative justice, taking into account: the legal bases that, in each country, trigger the access and use to restorative practices; the organisational framework and the attribution of responsibilities that determine the delivery of restorative measures; the implementation of restorative justice in practice; and finally the evaluation of strengths and weaknesses of restorative measures.

Vol I: Research and Selection of the Most Effective Juvenile Restorative Justice Practices in Europe: Snapshots from 28 EU Member States

Protecting Rights, Restoring Respect and Strengthening Relationships: European Model for Restorative Justice with Children and Young People

The European Model, which analyses good restorative practices, and key features of effectiveness, is based on the research conducted by a team of experts in the field of restorative justice. The experts also investigated the use of restorative measures through three case studies: Belgium, Finland and Northern Ireland. Tim Chapman, Course Director of the Restorative Practices Masters at the University of Ulster, coordinated the overall project. Maija Sisko Gellin, Finnish Forum for Mediation, who has extensive experience of mediation with young people both in schools and the criminal justice system, supported the practice model, in particular through knowledge of the juvenile restorative justice system in Finland. Monique Anderson, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, also supported the practice model, calling on her experiences with the juvenile restorative justice system in Belgium.

Vol II: Protecting Rights, Restoring Respect and Strengthening Relationships: European Model for Restorative Justice with Children and Young People

Toolkit for Professionals: Implementing a European Model for Restorative Justice with Children and Young People

Finally, the Toolkit was realised under the direction of the same research team that produced the Model. This final publication was designed to allow for clear and efficient implementation of the principles and methods illustrated in the Model, and is devised for practitioners of restorative justice and justice professionals, in order to diffuse effective practices.

Vol III: Toolkit for Professionals: Implementing a European Model for Restorative Justice with Children and Young People

You can access the web section here.

December 2009 - December 2011 - European Union Health, Mental, Offenders

The European Comparative Analysis and Transfer of Knowledge on Mental Health Resources for Young Offenders (MHYO) is an innovative and sustainable project aimed at sharing knowledge and expertise in the field of young offenders with mental health (MH) issues. Therefore, The European Commission’s Directorate General for Justice, Liberty and Security has supported the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) since the end of 2009 in the development, follow up and the leading action of the present project for analysis and comparison between European organisations that share an interest in the current situation of child and young offenders with mental health problems in Europe.
European Union Member States have to face similar issues when dealing with health, social, and justice institutions. The project aims to bring about innovative mechanisms for implementing a change and convergence, which foster all young offenders’ institutions and judicial services across the EU. There is a specific need for local, regional and national mental health institutions within the juvenile justice system in terms of MH resources for young offenders, as well as, mutual cooperation between bodies and agents with common responsibilities.

January 2010 - September 2011 - European Union Drug, Offenders, Prevention

Within the framework of the European Programme “drug prevention and information”, the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) is collaborating on The European Project. 'Juvenile Drug Use. Tertiary prevention strategies-”. According to the review of several studies and researches there have recently been several changes on the profile, age of first use of young people and drugs misuse. Bearing in mind that the target group of the present programme is youngsters in conflict with the law with substance misuse with community based sanctions, the partners project members will propose a reflection on the issue and tackle the national service strategies which are currently managing our target group. An interdisciplinary vision which involves the youth justice, public health and social services is crucial in the present approach. The possibility of establishing an exchange and transnational comparison – within Europe – that focuses on the development and implementation of effective strategies based on the analysis of the promising strategies at EU level, increases the efficacy of networks that include diverse institutions and the multidisciplinary nature that characterizes these networks.

December 2008 - July 2011 - European Union Delinquency, Offenders, Prevention

The IJJO participated and monitored the European project European Dimensions in Juvenile Delinquency. The objective of this programme, financed by the Directorate-General for Justice, Freedom and Security of the European Commission, was to promote efficient indications to define programmes for the prevention of juvenile delinquency by taking into consideration the experiences and results that were obtained in five European countries. In each country and also on a global level, recent phenomena in juvenile delinquency, like cyber-crime and E-bullying, the influence of drug use on crime, youth gangs and finally the exploitation of minor immigrants in crime, were analysed and studied. These topics were also developed during the International Congress on Recent 'Phenomena in Juvenile Delinquency: new penal forms' organised by the IJJO in 2007.

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  • International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO). Belgian Public Utility Foundation

    All rights reserved

  • Head Office: Rue Mercelis, nº 50. 1050. Brussels. Belgium

    Phone: 00 32 262 988 90. Fax: 00 32 262 988 99. oijj@oijj.org

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