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Saturday 14th of December 2019

What we do

November 2014 - October 2015 - European Union

The different standards still in place within various Member States of the EU when it comes to detention conditions, prison management and supervision, as well as alternatives to detention, make it apparent that there is a need for an exchange of best practice and experience in the field between various actors, so as to facilitate a more coherent European approach in the matter, as envisaged by the Commission’s Green Paper and the European Parliament’s aim of standardising legislation on detention related matters throughout the EU. The needs this project therefore addresses are those of greater cooperation, understanding and exchange of information on a European level of matters relating to detention and improving conditions. The setting of training seminars provides an ideal platform for this, where the need for better detention standards, alternatives to imprisonment, the rehabilitation of offenders,  the proper implementation of relevant EU framework decisions in the field and better cooperation between prison monitoring bodies can be discussed, analysed and effective ways forward realised.

The project consists of three seminars that will be implemented in two different European cities, Strasbourg (France) and Trier (Germany).

July 2013 - July 2015 - European Union Insertion, Justice, Juvenile, Prevention

The main value of the Project is the priority protection of children's rights in all cases when a child has already entered or is at risk of entering the Justice system and criminal contacts. In order to achieve the objectives, the Project activities are divided into 4 work streams: 1. European field study, researchers from 5 European countries gather the examples of innovative methods, tools and practices in their countries to share the experience among the specialists from Europe; the study includes 2 steps: the analysis of rights and practice in European countries (UK, Netherlands, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia) and the result analysis from the pilot projects activities; 2. Implementation of best practices and tools (specialists develop networks during the Project to strengthen the understanding of each good practice, tool or method from the European field study and decide on implementing them in the pilot places); 3. Three pilot projects implement the good practice, tools, methods identified by the researchers for the work with children. 4. Public education campaign (publications of research in English an Project booklet in Latvian, Lithuanian and Estonian; presentations of the booklets; final conference on the Project results (Brussels, 100 participants); educational film on the course of the Project activities which will be available for public and educational use thus ensuring the sustainability of Project results).

Please click on this link to access the 'Keeping Youth Away From Crime' web section for further information about this project.

January 2013 - December 2014 - European Union Rights, Training

Managed by Save the Children Romania, one of the members of the European Council for Juvenile Justice, the Children’s Legal Education – Adapted Resources (aka CLEAR project) aims at developing and ensuring the effectiveness of a child-friendly Manual educating children about their rights and of an affiliated Tool Guide designed for professional practitioners such as teachers, educators, social and / or community workers, etc.

At first, the Manual and the Tool Guide will be developed in collaboration by the seven different partners involved in CLEAR; both will be reviewed several times thanks to e.g. the support of focus groups, online consultations, the involvement of Children’s Rights experts and children themselves. These two processes, the draft and review of the Manual and Tool Guide, will take approximately a year and a half whereas the last part of this project, the dissemination of the outputs, will be spread over the last six months that is to say at the end of 2014.

Giving its extensive network of collaborators, the International Juvenile Justice Observatory hopes to bring a European-wide perspective to this project and to actively contribute to its dissemination. As a matter of fact, the IJJO will first make sure that inspiring practices other than those developed and implemented within the six other European country partners will be taken into account before largely contributing to the dissemination at a EU-level of the Manual, of the Tool Guide, and of the different findings highlighted throughout the length of the project.

Please click on this link to access the 'CLEAR' web section for further information about this project.

January 2013 - December 2014 - European Union Protection, Restorative

Led by the British Association for Adoption and Fostering, this ambitious European project aims at promoting fostering programmes as an alternative to detention for children waiting for their trial or sentence as well as for those found guilty of offences sufficiently serious to warrant custody. As a matter of fact, fostering is one of the many alternatives to custody quoted by Article 40 of the UNCRC; yet, its use remains exeptional throughout Europe.

Project members aims at first drafting an overview of inspiring fostring practices implemented within the European Union before developing a comprehensive step-by-step multi-agency framework for an Intensive and Remand Fostering Programme. The protocol of intervention will include a training programme and briefing documents designed to be effective tools for multi-agency networks, in particular foster carers,  fostering and youth justice staff, criminal justice and police personnel , with proposed core minimum standards, guidelines, practical tools procedures and information designed for young people.

Contributing to the European desk analysis of fostering programmes throughout Europe and thus bringing a widespread European perspective to this project, the IJJO hopes to take this particular collaboration as an opportunity to foster aternatives to custody in all their diversity, notably before national and European decision-makers via advocacy campaigns, lobbying and other media stunts.

Please click on this link to access the 'Alternatives to Custody for Young Offenders’ web section for further information about this project.

July 2014 - December 2014 - Europe Adolescent, Child, Justice, Juvenile, Offenders, Reintegration, Research, Restorative, Rights, Standards, Victims

Restorative practices support a participative notion of justice, that favours reintegration over retribution and punishment. As such, by investing in the youths' bond to the community and in a process that stimulates assumption of responsibility, restorative practices may prove particularly appropriate to integrate the best interest of the child in the justice process.

Furthermore, this research, through its definite regional connotation, was designed to stress the common denominator of practices that vary considerably from one European country to the other. In particular, the traditional focus on a children´s rights perspective, that prevails in European and EU standards, and that includes both the rights of the offender and the victim.

The project, carried out by the IJJO's European Council for Juvenile Justice, provided for three main outputs, in the form of the following final publications:

Research and Selection of the Most Effective Juvenile Restorative Justice Practices in Europe: Snapshots from 28 EU Member States

The team of experts from Greisfwald University, composed of Professor Frieder Dunkel and Doctor Andrea Parosanu, were in charge of the analysis of existing restorative practices across the 28 EU Member States, reviewed in the 28 final national snapshots. The research investigated the various factors that contribute to the effectiveness of restorative justice, taking into account: the legal bases that, in each country, trigger the access and use to restorative practices; the organisational framework and the attribution of responsibilities that determine the delivery of restorative measures; the implementation of restorative justice in practice; and finally the evaluation of strengths and weaknesses of restorative measures.

Vol I: Research and Selection of the Most Effective Juvenile Restorative Justice Practices in Europe: Snapshots from 28 EU Member States

Protecting Rights, Restoring Respect and Strengthening Relationships: European Model for Restorative Justice with Children and Young People

The European Model, which analyses good restorative practices, and key features of effectiveness, is based on the research conducted by a team of experts in the field of restorative justice. The experts also investigated the use of restorative measures through three case studies: Belgium, Finland and Northern Ireland. Tim Chapman, Course Director of the Restorative Practices Masters at the University of Ulster, coordinated the overall project. Maija Sisko Gellin, Finnish Forum for Mediation, who has extensive experience of mediation with young people both in schools and the criminal justice system, supported the practice model, in particular through knowledge of the juvenile restorative justice system in Finland. Monique Anderson, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, also supported the practice model, calling on her experiences with the juvenile restorative justice system in Belgium.

Vol II: Protecting Rights, Restoring Respect and Strengthening Relationships: European Model for Restorative Justice with Children and Young People

Toolkit for Professionals: Implementing a European Model for Restorative Justice with Children and Young People

Finally, the Toolkit was realised under the direction of the same research team that produced the Model. This final publication was designed to allow for clear and efficient implementation of the principles and methods illustrated in the Model, and is devised for practitioners of restorative justice and justice professionals, in order to diffuse effective practices.

Vol III: Toolkit for Professionals: Implementing a European Model for Restorative Justice with Children and Young People

You can access the web section here.

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  • International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO). Belgian Public Utility Foundation

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  • Head Office: Rue Mercelis, nº 50. 1050. Brussels. Belgium

    Phone: 00 32 262 988 90. Fax: 00 32 262 988 99. oijj@oijj.org

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