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Thursday 17th of October 2019

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June 2015 - June 2017 - Europe Adolescent, Crime, Delinquency, Detention, Freedom, Law, Legislation, Measures

The European Council has noted that “excessively long periods of pre-trial detention are detrimental for the individual, can prejudice judicial cooperation between the member states and do not represent the values for which the European Union stands”, considering that pre-trial detention offers important justice safeguards while it is intended as an exceptional measure. Over-use of this measure is ruining lives and using a large amount of European Union countries’ resources.

There is a clear need for guaranteeing minimum conditions when a minor is arrested before trial. Despite this, there are no common rules for all Member States in relation to procedures and conditions of such preventive detention and pre-trial detention, regardless of the interest of United Nations and European Union Institutions.

Therefore, in order to comply with the minimum rules, the MIPREDET project aims to explore the situation in different countries in Europe, in order to recommend measures to be applied to fulfil the identified needs and assess how the new proposal for a Directive of The European Parliament and of the Council on procedural safeguards for children suspected or accused in criminal proceedings is being applied in practice. The target groups of the project are: organisations related to juvenile justice; experts (researchers, university professors); custodial centre staff; justice practitioners (judges, attorneys, lawyers); policy makers; and law enforcement authorities.

The project is scheduled to last 24 months. It started in June 2015 and will end in June 2017.

For more information, click here.

March 2015 - February 2017 - Europe Good practices, Justice, Juvenile, Reform, Systems, Training

The varying levels of implementation of international standards concerning children in conflict with the law have become a problem inherent in the field of Juvenile Justice, due to various reasons, with a lack of specific training in Juvenile Justice at both the EU and the local level being key. Current training methods in how Juvenile Justice stakeholders communicate with children in conflict with the law is somewhat lacking.

Therefore, the project ‘Improving Juvenile Justice Systems in Europe: Training for Professionals’, elaborated by the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO), intends to provide information, knowledge and training to juvenile justice national authorities and staff working with juvenile offenders at a European level, in order to promote a better implementation of international standards concerning children in conflict with the law. It involves the IJJO think tank and formal network: the European Council of Juvenile Justice.

The project focuses on improving juvenile justice national systems and exchanging promising practices concerning juvenile offenders subject to sanctions or measures. It consists of training modules on the creation on child-friendly justice and follows a two part approach:

Training of trainers (national Juvenile Justice stakeholders) and,

National interdisciplinary workshops on child-friendly justice (for defender, social, healthcare professionals, penitentiary staff, etc).

The training of trainers focuses on capacity building for juvenile justice stakeholders and the content of national workshops will follow the recommendations of the IJJO White Paper ‘Save Money, Protect Society and Realise Youth Potential - Improving Youth Justice Systems during a Time of Economic Crisis’, in particular how and why assess the need of children in conflict with the law deprived of liberty, with a special interest in promoting alternative measures and restorative approaches.

The accent is given to the importance of developing individualised programs for children in conflict with the law, and developing specific knowledge for professionals concerning children rights, communication with children and preparation to the release.

For more information, click here.

November 2014 - October 2016 - Europe Good practices, Justice, Juvenile, Measures, Protection, Public policies, Restorative, Rights, Systems, Victims

The project ‘REVIJ - Reparation to the Victim in the European Juvenile Justice Systems: Comparative Analysis and Transfer of Best Practices’ aims to conduct a comparative of the measures provided for victims in the European juvenile justice systems, focusing on analyzing two aspects:

First, if these measures provided for victims comply with Directive 2012/29/EU of the European Parliament and of The Council, of 25 October 2012, in establishing minimum standards on the rights, support and protection of victims of crime.

Second, the practices that are carried out in restorative services within the juvenile justice field, and the type of guarantees they offer to victims.

You can access the web section here.

September 2015 - September 2016 Kenya - Africa Human Rights, Violation

Kenya has ratified all of the key international human rights treaties guaranteeing the respect of human rights within detention facilities. It also enshrined most of the key global human rights principles within its 2010 Constitution. However, despite the presence of a fairly comprehensive legislative framework, implementation of human rights enforcement mechanisms remains poor in Kenya. This poor implementation increases the likelihood of human rights violations within Kenyan correctional facilities.

Within this context, the project ‘Strengthening Human Rights within Correctional Facilities in Kenya’ aims to eradicate all forms of human rights violations within detention and custodial facilities in Kenya.

Utilising the wide experience of the project coordinator, the European Committee for Training and Agriculture (CEFA), and the other partners from the justice administration and penal reform sector in Kenya, the project intends to protect detainees’ human rights by promoting policy dialogue, advocacy and support of Kenyan Human Rights Defenders (HRDs) to ensure effective law enforcement. The project addresses the issues of delayed reforms and fragmented intervention by strengthening the HRDs’ role and their coordination with different authorities through an inter-agency approach, alongside improving monitoring processes in correctional facilities. The Justice System’s National Plan on Human Rights and its policy and advocacy components have supported systemic and integrated coordination among the main HRDs, dealing with administration of justice in Kenya and spearheading the actual implementation of existing delayed reforms.

As a project partner, the IJJO has published an analysis of human rights violations within correctional facilities in Kenya, titled 'Human Rights and Deprivation of Liberty in Kenya: An analysis of the human rights’ situation and guidelines for an internal monitoring system'. Within the framework of this publication, the IJJO has also developed guidelines on best practice of monitoring and reporting human rights violations, created in the course of the project within Kenyan detention facilities. The main purpose of this publication is to provide evidence-based recommendations on human rights protection and violation prevention. This aims not only to support the implementation of the project itself, but also to support institutional authorities, policy makers and practitioners in the construction of evidence-based action plans and the establishment of effective monitoring and reporting systems.

Download the report: 'Human Rights and Deprivation of Liberty in Kenya'

May 2014 - May 2016 - Europe Adolescent, Child, Education, Protection, Rights, Victims

Participation in legal proceedings places children at high risk of victimisation. Research from SAPI (Social Activities and Practices Institute – Bulgaria) showed that children are repeatedly interviewed about the same subject by police officers, social workers, investigators, experts, judges, etc., most of which have little child-oriented knowledge, and are not capable of correctly interrogating children. Medical examinations are still conducted without consideration for the child’s specific needs, which carries a high risk for secondary victimisation, especially in sexual abuse cases. Overall, research shows that child victims or witnesses of crime’s rights to information, accompaniment and support are not at all guaranteed.

The project aims to improve the situation of child victims or witnesses of crime in legal proceedings through an integrated approach. In support of programme priority “Supporting victims of crime”, the project promotes the use of the 2012 Directive on minimum standards on the rights, support and protection of victims of crime, “in order to improve mutual trust with the view to ensuring protection of rights of victims and of the accused”.

The project's final outcome is the production of a detailed model for multidisciplinary needs assessment and, on this basis, the development of an integrated approach for guaranteeing the child’s rights and best interests during their involvement in legal proceedings.

The target groups are:

1) Professionals involved in criminal procedures (police, prosecutors, judges) in Bulgaria, France, Italy and Romania, who will take part in educational activities to improve their attitudes and their capacity for guaranteeing the child’s rights in a multidisciplinary manner.

2) Professionals from the system of child protection; social service providers; forensic medicine specialists providing expertise and psycho-therapeutic support to child victims of crime in Bulgaria and France; and state policy makers, who will be introduced to an integrated approach to assessing and responding to the needs of children involved in criminal proceedings.

The project is scheduled to last 24 months. It started in May 2014 and will end in May 2016.

To access the project's web section, click here

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  • International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO). Belgian Public Utility Foundation

    All rights reserved

  • Head Office: Rue Mercelis, nº 50. 1050. Brussels. Belgium

    Phone: 00 32 262 988 90. Fax: 00 32 262 988 99. oijj@oijj.org

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